Aquatic Therapy
Aquatics Benefits:
-Arthritis
-Pain
-Fibromyalgia
-Low Back Pain
-Knee and Hip Pain
-Rheumatism
-Stress Fractures
-Shoulder Pain
-Mid Back Pain
-Sports Injuries

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McMinnville Physical Therapy, PLLC
The Aquatic Therapy Center at McMinnville Physical Therapy is geared towards those who do not tolerate impact exercise, are trying to find alternatives to surgery, may have failed other types of therapy or surgical intervention, or simply wish to try it.

Do I need to know how to swim? No, the deepest level is less than five feet and the pool is designed with bars to assist with balance.

Why does aquatic therapy work? As a therapy pool the water is warm, not like the typical recreational swimming pools. The warmth helps ease muscle tightness and increase flexibility. Additionally, the buoyancy reduces impact, but resistance can be increased or decreased with a variety of methods, so you can still get strong too.

How does it work? A physical therapist will perform an initial evaluation within the clinic. The following visits, the therapy sessions will be performed in the pool. The number of sessions with the physical therapist will depend on your conditions, physician referral, and insurance policy.

When I graduate, will I be able to perform my exercises in the pool independently? Yes, the Aquatic Therapy Center has a maintenance program and encourages you to continue.

SUPPORTIVE RESEARCH:

McEvoy, Cheryl. "Aquatic Therapy for Arthritis." Advance for Physical Therapy & Rehab Medicine. Page 35: May 17, 2010.
http://physical-therapy.advanceweb.com/Archives/Article-Archives/Aquatic-Therapy-for-Arthritis.aspx

Kim and Park. "Effects of a Water Exercise Programme on Body Composition, Physical Ability and Pain in Middle-Aged Obese Women with Knee Osteoarthritis."  British Journal of Sports Medicine. 2010; 44: i4.
http://bjsm.bmj.com/content/44/14/i4.1.short?rss=1

Kamalakkannan et al. "Aquatic Training with and Without Weights and its Impact on Agility and Explosive Power Among Volleyball Players." British Journal of Sports Medicine. 2010; 44: i16-i17.
http://bjsm.bmj.com/content/44/14/i16.3.short?rss=1

Mazzardo et al. "High-Intensity Extended Swimming Exercise Reduces Pain-Related Behavior..." The Journal of Pain. 2010; 11: 1384-1393.
http://www.jpain.org/article/PIIS1526590010004426/abstract?rss=yes